There has been some buzz in the CSS communities about a new workaround technique for image replacement. This technique has been dubbed The Kellum Method and provides some benefits that include:

  • Really long strings of text will never flow into the container because they always flow away from the container.
  • Performance is dramatically improved because a 9999px box is not drawn. Noticeably so in animations on the iPad 1.

In Phark Method, a large (9999px + size of your image) box is drawn by the browser. Instead in the Kellum Method the text is indented only to the size required (width of the text + size of your image). In theory, this cuts down on processing as the browser is working with a smaller zone. This method seems to have a full array of browser support.

I see some value in replacing the old Phark’s method for image replacement (-9999px indent hack). However, I’m not sure I buy in to the “dramatically improved” performance that it provides, but any improvement is better than nothing.

At the end of the day, I am all about good workarounds and will likely incorporate this one into my work. What I am really waiting for is to take advantage of the CSS3 solutions and hoping for more free, web licensed fonts to be available in the near future.